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Enterprise Architects: The Key to Digital Transformation

Enterprise Architects: The Key to Digital Transformation

Enterprise Architects: The Key to Digital Transformation

The digital transformation of organizational structure relies heavily upon the fully engaged enterprise architects from integration to adaptability.

Keyword(s): enterprise architects

Digital transformation is happening across the world. Every day businesses are taking the step online to take advantage of this new market to see how they can benefit.

With 88,000 people now having the TOGAF certification, enterprise architecture is still growing, and businesses are looking for people to fill this role in their companies.

You need to know how to navigate the new digital landscape and have the systems in place to connect you with the world. This post will tell you how enterprise architects are helping make this change and how they can help transform businesses.

Keep reading to learn what an enterprise architect does and how they will help shape businesses.

What Does Digital Transformation Mean?

Businesses have seen rapid change throughout history, and it has come in all shapes and forms. Digital transformation is the change that is brought about with the internet and how it connects us to the world.

These new communication models and the ability to interact easily with the rest of the world has caused us to re-examine how we do business. Businesses need to adapt if they want to keep being successful.

With these advances, we've seen the development of new tools that allow us to reach customers that have never existed before. Along with that, we have ways to collaborate internally and with other businesses to create win-win situations for everyone.

We've been going digital for a while. But, the transformation we see now has only been made possible through the advancements made in social media, big data, eCommerce, and cloud technologies.

These technologies are giving companies insights that they have never gotten before. It is allowing them to change how they market and communicate with their customers.

What is an Enterprise Architect?

When you're going digital, it isn't smart to jump in and try things at random. There has been enough work done to know what the best practices are and the services you need for companies to function at its best.

An enterprise architect is the person that makes sure a business process properly makes use of the technology available to you today. An enterprise architect will usually report to someone high up in the company hierarchy and help make high-level decisions for the company.

There are four components that an architect will consider. These components are business, applications, technology, and information.

What Does an Enterprise Architect Do?

There is a lot of work to do when taking a company digital. An architect will have developed a wide range of skills to help with this. You can expect them to handle the following issues.

Identify Tools to Help Current Processes

One immediate benefit you can see by going digital is the increase in productivity and collaboration ability of the internet. There are countless project management and communication tools that make doing business easier.

An architect will know which of these tools will fit in businesses and help integrate it into a company's teams.

Connect Organizations to Data

Big data is the next big thing.

Consumer data is being used in all aspects of marketing. You can find it in social networks, from search engines, and anywhere else they leave a footprint on the internet. An enterprise architect will develop systems for getting data that is beneficial for an organization.

As the world begins to become even more data-oriented, many of your decisions are going to be based on it. An organization needs to have reliable and current data to keep making the right decisions in the future.

Strategic Planning For the Future

There are a lot of best practices now, but that doesn't mean that they will remain the same tomorrow. An enterprise architect needs to stay up to date with trends and new technology in the industry.

They will be able to identify the technology and platforms that work and plan to make use of them. This planning may not be only a weekly or monthly view. Many architects will design for upwards of two years at a time.

That isn't to say that plans won't change though. A good architect will need to be agile for changes that happen quickly. They should be able to jump on a new technology or initiative and help a company take full advantage of its benefits.

Disaster Response and Preparation

You never expect it to happen. But then the worst comes to pass. You've suffered a data loss and haven't prepared at all.

An enterprise architect now has more data to manage than ever. They will need to develop backup plans to help prevent data loss from occurring.

You will also need to prepare for cybersecurity threats. You need a plan in place to both prevent and react to intrusions.

What Training Do Enterprise Architects Receive?

A digital architect seems like a jack of all trades when taking a glance at the job. You need to have your hands in a little bit of everything.

But there have been systems developed that help put things into perspective. There have been four different types of enterprise architecture frameworks developed today that offer certifications to prove that you've done the work.

  • Open Group Architectural Framework
  • Federal Enterprise Architectural Framework
  • Zachman Framework
  • Gartner

Each of these four frameworks has its own merits, and it is up to you to decide which one to follow.

If you are working for business now, you will need to examine each of these to determine which framework fits best for the business where you are employed. If not, find one that you think will work best for your work style and find a company to apply it to.

Each of them is tested and will work if applied correctly.

Start Your Training Today

Now that you know how valuable enterprise architects are becoming, it's time to start training for the job. Our courses will set you on the right path to getting your certifications so you can begin working as soon as possible.

Contact us today to learn how we can help!

The 8 TOGAF Architecture Principles You Need to Know

The 8 TOGAF Architecture Principles You Need to Know

The 8 TOGAF Architecture Principles You Need to Know

Becoming a successful TOGAF architect means mastering the principles of the practice. Here are the critical TOGAF architecture principles you need to know.

Keyword(s): architecture principles

For many people, it feels like technology is growing faster than humans can keep up with.

For businesses, this presents a potential problem in their IT departments. With such rapid growth and changes happening in Information Technology, it's more crucial than ever to have a clear plan on how to run things.

This is where TOGAF Enterprise Architecture comes in.

TOGAF principles provide a set of guidelines that will give your enterprise a clear architectural structure on the path to business success.

Knowledgable TOGAF Architects have never been in higher demand, with 60% of executives identifying enterprise architecture as one of their top 5 priorities in their business strategies.

If you want to become an Enterprise Architect and take part in building an enterprise's strong foundation, then now is the time to start learning some key TOGAF architecture principles.

What Are Enterprise Architecture Principles?

Principles are the rules and guidelines that an enterprise follows. These principles help organizations to keep everything running smoothly. Principles can exist at different levels throughout the enterprise.

Architecture principles are the rules and guidelines specific to an enterprise's architecture. They are a subset of IT principles. Enterprises use their architecture principles to govern their information management systems and any other IT tools.

TOGAF, The Open Group Architecture Framework, has laid out an example set of 21 high-quality architecture principles.

There are a few things you will notice about the TOGAF principles.

First of all, a TOGAF architecture principle is divided into 4 parts. A TOGAF principle always has a:

  1. Name - Clear, precise, and easy to remember.
  2. Statement - Generally one sentence in length. Clearly tells you what the principle is.
  3. Rationale - Explanation of why the principle is important and how it will benefit the business.
  4. Implications - List of what is required to successfully carry out this principle and how it could potentially impact the business.

Of the 21 principles, there are four different domains (or subsets) of TOGAF architecture principles:

  • Business Architecture (deals with your business strategy and organization of business processes)
  • Data Architecture (deals with the management and structure of data resources)
  • Application Architecture (deals with individual application systems and how they work with each other)
  • Technology Architecture (deals with tech requirements that are necessary to keep the enterprise running smoothly)

Each of these subsets contains specific enterprise architect principles regarding that domain and its operations. We'll be looking at some of the most important examples below.

How Many Architecture Principles Does an Enterprise Need?

In general, you should aim for 10-20 guiding principles for your enterprise architecture.

If you have too many architecture principles, it will limit your architecture's flexibility. Too few, on the other hand, leads to generic statements that can't be implemented in a practical, real-world way.

Out of the 21 TOGAF architecture principles, here are the 8 critical principles that we think you need to know:

1. Maximize Benefit to the Enterprise

All decisions about information management MUST be made based on the benefit of the enterprise.

That means that sometimes, what feels best for one organization within the enterprise might not be what's best for the enterprise as a whole.

All individuals and organizations within the enterprise must be willing to work together, following the guiding principles, for the maximum benefit of the enterprise.

2. Information Management is Everybody's Business

This TOGAF principle states that "all organizations in the enterprise must be involved in all aspects of the information environment."

Basically, this is another principle about the importance of working together across an enterprise. Everyone needs to take responsibility for doing their own part in managing information and participating in important decisions.

3. Business Continuity

This principle states that "hardware failure, natural disasters, and data corruption should not be allowed to disrupt or stop enterprise activities."

In other words, even though we're all depending on technological systems to get our job done, we also have to be prepared to keep the enterprise running even when those systems go down.

4. Data as an Asset

All data is a concrete, valuable asset to an enterprise. It is a real, measurable resource.

Because all decisions in an enterprise are made based on data, all that data needs to be carefully organized and managed. Everyone in the enterprise should know that their data is reliable and accurate.

They should also know how to access relevant data whenever they need to.

5. Data is Shared

This principle says that data should be stored within one application and shared across the entire enterprise. This is important so that everyone within the enterprise has access to the data they need to do their job.

Storing all the data within one application is much cheaper and easier than storing it in different applications.

6. Data is Accessible

This one means that everyone in an enterprise needs to have easy access to all data within that enterprise. This makes it easier to do their jobs.

One of the "implications" of this principle is that there needs to be some flexibility to make sure that all the different people of an enterprise are able to access data in a way that best works for them.

You can see that these three principles all tie together closely: data is an asset, data is shared, data is accessible.

7. Ease-of-Use

All technology within an enterprise needs to be easy to use.

The more time you spend trying to figure out how to use technology, the less time you have to spend on your actual task. That means less productivity and lower concentration -- never a good thing.

Keep the technology simple, so that everyone can do their jobs efficiently and effectively.

8. Control Technical Diversity

Although there will necessarily be some different technical requirements for the various applications across an enterprise, this principle states that you will try to keep the different technologies to a minimum.

The more different technologies that you throw into the mix, the more expensive and troublesome it gets for your enterprise.

Want to Know More?

Enterprise architecture principles are the rules and guidelines that help to keep an enterprise running smoothly at its highest potential.

The 8 that we talked about here are just a few important TOGAF principles, but that's not even half the list.

If you really want to dive deep into the world of enterprise architecture, consider taking a TOGAF Foundations course to learn more and start your own journey towards becoming a successful TOGAF architect.

Everything You Need to Know About Passing Your TOGAF Foundation Exam

Everything You Need to Know About Passing Your TOGAF Foundation Exam

Everything You Need to Know About Passing Your TOGAF Foundation Exam

The TOGAF Foundation is the precursor to your TOGAF Certification exam, which you'll need to pass with flying colors. Here's what you need to know about it.

Keyword(s): togaf foundation

If you are an aspiring information technology architect looking for a job, you need to have qualifications and experience to prove that you can do the job.

The Open Group Architecture Framework (TOGAF) certification comes into play. The TOGAF Certification Program has enabled more than 80,000 Enterprise Architects and trainers worldwide to demonstrate their proven knowledge of the framework.

Check out our guide on everything you need to know about passing your TOGAF Foundation exam.

What is TOGAF?

The Open Group Architecture Framework, also referred to as TOGAF, is a framework for enterprise architecture. It provides an approach for designing, planning, implementing, and governing an enterprise IT architecture.

Essentially, TOGAF helps organisations design IT infrastructures that meet the requirements of their business.

TOGAF encapsulates a high-level approach to enterprise architecture. Enterprise architecture is split into four different domains: data, technology, application, and business.

TOGAF is ideal for developers and technical leads who want to enhance their skill set and become an Enterprise Architect.

What Do TOGAF Professionals Do?

TOGAF certified professionals, also known as Enterprise Architects, help to create and develop long term IT strategies for businesses. Enterprise Architects are responsible for making sure that the IT processes run smoothly.

TOGAF qualified professionals often work with large companies that want to ensure their business strategy aligns with their information technology.

According to The Open Group, as of 2016 60% of Fortune 500 companies have adopted TOGAF as their standard.

How Do You Become TOGAF Certified?

TOGAF has two exams that you can take: TOGAF 9 Foundation and TOGAF 9 Certified. To become qualified and certified, you need to pass the TOGAF exams.

TOGAF 9 Foundation Exam

The TOGAF Foundation exam, or the TOGAF Part 1, compromises of 40 multiple choice questions. Each question is worth one mark. You need to get at least 55% to pass, which means you need to score at least 22 out of 40.

The time limit for the TOGAF 9 Foundation exam is 60 minutes. So, make sure you space out your time and allow enough time to go back to any questions that you want to check.

You can retake the test if you fail, however you need to wait a month before you can try the exam again.

TOGAF 9 Certified Exam

The TOGAF 9 Certified exam, or TOGAF Part 2, compromises of 8 complex scenario questions with gradient scoring. The correct answer scores you 5 points, the second best scores you 3 points, the third best answer scores you 1 point.

You need to get at least 60% to pass the exam, which means you need to score 24 points or more out of 40.

The TOGAF 9 Certified exam time limit is 90 minutes and is an open book exam. Similar to the TOGAF 9 Foundation exam, if you fail the test you need to wait a month before you can retake it.

TOGAF 9 Combined Part 1 and 2

If you want to take the exams together, you can do so with the TOGAF 9 Combined Part 1 and 2 exams. This allows you to achieve a Level 2 TOGAF 9 certification after you have completed and passed the two tests.

The TOGAF 9 Combined Part 1 and 2 is just the same as if you were to take the exams separately. Part 1 is to be completed in 60 minutes and has 40 multiple choice questions. Whilst part 2 has to be completed in 90 minutes and it also has 8 complex scenario questions.

There is no break in between the exams. So, all together for the combined TOGAF exams, you have 150 minutes.

Training and TOGAF certification cost varies depending on your chosen training provider and where you choose to do the exam.

5 Reasons Why You Should Get a TOGAF Certification

TOGAF certifications can be difficult to get because there is a lot of data that you have to remember in order to pass the tests. But it is totally worth training and preparing yourself for the exam because of these 5 reasons:

1. Enterprise Architects Are in High Demand

Enterprise Architects are in high demand because more and more businesses are looking to structure their businesses with more effective strategies.

Due to Enterprise Architects being in high demand, it also means that businesses are willing to pay good money for you to help them with their IT infrastructure.

2. High Investment Returns

Because TOGAF training courses and the examinations don't cost that much to do, they are a budget-friendly certification that can help you make more money in your career.

If you want a new challenge, it might be time to invest in your future by taking the TOGAF exams.

3. Validate Your Skills

TOGAF is a recognised certificate, so becoming TOGAF certified means that industry professionals are more likely to work with you. Companies can trust that you have the skills and knowledge necessary for taking their enterprise architecture and their business to the next level.

4. Anyone Can Take the Exam

Unlike other courses, TOGAF doesn't require you to have any prior qualifications or special requirements. So if you are looking for a way to get into IT architecture, taking the TOGAF exam is a great place to start.

5. Improve Your Management Skills

TOGAF combines the technical aspects of IT and the management side of the profession. TOGAF qualifications are a great idea for professionals who want to improve their management skills. During your career as an Enterprise Architect, you'll need to have good management skills so that you can keep an eye on all the different goings on during your designing of IT infrastructure.

Start Your TOGAF Foundation Training and Exam

Start your Enterprise Architect career today by starting your training course.

Need more motivation to start? Enterprise Architects can earn up to £88,000 a year.

Remember to revise and that your hard work will all pay off, once you become TOGAF certified.

Contact us now to learn more about our TOGAF Foundation courses and exams.

Enterprise vs. Solution vs. Infrastructure: Understanding the Different Technology Architectures

Enterprise vs. Solution vs. Infrastructure: Understanding the Different Technology Architectures

Understanding the Different Technology Architectures

There are many different ways to organize your company's IT architecture. Read this guide for a rundown of the different types of technology architectures.

Keyword(s): technology architectures

Technology architects work with an organization to make sure their infrastructure up to scratch. They also make sure the architecture works for the business — not against it.

These architects have different roles according to the different types of architecture deployed.

Three of these technology architectures include enterprise, solution, and infrastructure architecture. What do these three types of architecture do for a business?

Each of these types of architecture looks for options to improve the technology framework. At the same time, there are some pretty key differences between the three. The largest is the architecture's scope.

Ready to learn more? We break them down for you here.

The Three Technology Architectures

The difference between enterprise, solution, and infrastructure technology architectures exists in the scope of the architecture. In other words, each impacts different parts of the company.

The broadest is enterprise architecture, which encompasses the entire organization. The next two zero in on specific components in solution and infrastructure architecture.

Enterprise Architecture

Enterprise architecture (EA) aligns your organization's IT infrastructure with your overall business goals. It shows you how your technology, information, and business flow together to achieve goals.

EA allows for analysis, design, planning, and implementation at an enterprise level. It perceives industry trends and navigates disruptions using a specific set of principles known as enterprise architectural planning (EAP).

The benefits of applying EA come to the fore during processes like re-organization or a merger or acquisition.

It standardizes and consolidates the process. The end result is ensuring consistency and alignment across the board.

Benefits include:

  • Open collaboration between business units and IT
  • Simpler evaluation of the present architecture compared to long-term goals
  • Comprehensive "50,000-foot" view of IT for all business units
  • Benchmarking framework for comparison of baseline against standards or competition

EA needs a guide, and that guide is an enterprise architect, who reports to the CIO.

The role of the enterprise architect includes:

  • Analyzing trends in technology architecture
  • Evaluating applications against business and enterprise standards
  • Identifying the viability of the architecture within organizational changes
  • Educating IT teams on best practices

Within EA exists four types of architecture:

TOGAF makes up 80 percent of all business framework structures. Enterprises overwhelmingly prefer it because it is all-encompassing. It also offers a common vocabulary and makes it easy to define best practices.

Solution Architecture

Solution architecture (SA) describes the architecture of a technological solution. It uses different perspectives including information, technical, and business. It also considers the solution from the point of EA.

Enterprise architects are best known for taking the "50,000-foot view" of a project. A solutions architect zones in on the details.

Solution architecture concerns itself with the technical decisions involved in organizing and implementing the solution. It then compares them to business outcomes.

The solution architect makes decisions about the nature of the solution. Those decisions might include:

  • Building vs. buying solutions
  • Technology platforms
  • Scaling the solution to integrate
  • Deploying solution components

The solution begins as a concept. But these decisions like the ones above transform it. Under the eye of a solution architect, ideas become concrete software solutions.

Solution architects aren't just designers. They also perform key roles like:

  • Managing teams during design and construction of application development
  • Mentoring and training personnel
  • Monitoring strategic relationships
  • Communicating business goals with the application development team

Finally, solution architecture doesn't leave the key stakeholders behind. It considers the needs of senior management, business users, and IT. However, it strikes a balance between the needs while still aiming for the stated business outcome.

The bottom line: solution architecture and its architects focus on technical leadership. Their job is done when everyone buys into the technical vision and understands how it contributes to the business vision.

Infrastructure Architecture

Infrastructure architecture refers to the sum of the company's hardware and IT capability. Achieving synergy between all the devices is its overarching goal.

In the past, infrastructure architecture was the focal point for security. Today, it goes further. It's a structured approach for modeling an enterprise's hardware elements. Those models also involve defining the operating relationship between them. It is a well-documented approach that includes the correct detail and abstraction as it pertains to different key stakeholders.

The key objective of infrastructure architects is ensuring that the organization's technical systems and infrastructure support the organization's requirements.

They may look at the business strategy for scaling, data security, or supporting a drive towards mobile integration.

An infrastructure architect fulfills its role by:

  • Determining technical requirements for delivering and maintaining infrastructure
  • Participating in program audits and project reviews
  • Manage technical projects
  • Manage core infrastructure
  • Recommend system technologies
  • Create and design (and redesign) technological infrastructure
  • Build consensus between teams

Infrastructure architecture doesn't offer as comprehensive a view as EA. But it does encompass more of the IT system than SA does.

Infrastructure architecture is also arguably the most changeable of the three. Big data and virtualization now mean enterprises' infrastructure is now under constant pressure. Not only are there greater technical requirements required, but both security and integration contribute to new challenges faced daily.

Become a Certified Enterprise Architect

Enterprise architecture is the broadest of the technology architectures in scope. With so many critical responsibilities, it's no wonder that certifications are in such great demand.

If you are an IT professional, getting certified is the next step in your career.

For businesses, seeking certification for teams is the critical step for aligning your IT and business goals. It also prevents you from losing both productivity and cash in the chasm that too often falls between infrastructure and goals.

Are you looking for in-house or online training? We offer training for TOGAF 9.2, ArchiMate 3.0 and IT4IT certifications. Get in touch today to start your journey towards certification.

Enterprise Architect Job Outlook: What Does the Future Hold in This Field?

Enterprise Architect Job Outlook: What Does the Future Hold in This Field?

Enterprise Architect Job Outlook: What Does the Future Hold?

Enterprise architecture is a growing field. Here is your breakdown of the enterprise architect job outlook going forward.

Keyword(s): enterprise architect job outlook

Enterprise architects can make well over $100,000 per year. And it's a career that can unlock the potential of businesses.

But not everyone knows the pros and cons to this top career.

We've broken down the keys to this job and its ins and outs. Read on for a guide to the enterprise architect job outlook.

Enterprise Architect Job Outlook

Businesses are rapidly turning to enterprise architecture for high-level company solutions. In fact, surveys say as many as 60 percent of executives list enterprise architecture as a top key to executing their strategic plan.

And with technology growing faster than ever, enterprise architecture is on the rise. In less than 10 years, the United States is expected to need more than 500,000 new jobs in tech-driven areas, like enterprise architecture.

Even with this bright enterprise architecture job outlook, it's good to get a handle on the position before jumping into the career.

What is Enterprise Architecture?

Enterprise architecture takes a holistic approach to boosting business productivity. It pulls a bunch of operations and systems together and gets the whole corporation on the same page.

That usually means taking a look at a company's different technology, information systems, and processes. And good enterprise architecture will shift those entities towards the same company goals.

Because technology is advancing so quickly, some companies are left with a bit of a technological mess. They may use a mix of different systems, applications, and software.

And it's not uncommon for a single company to use cloud servers, physical servers, and additional software all at once.

Enterprise architects can line everything up and centralize tasks to align with one mission.

Benefits of Enterprise Architecture

Wondering why the enterprise architect career outlook is in high demand? A big reason is its ability to completely reshape a company.

Here are some ways enterprise architects can strengthen a corporation:

Boosted Productivity

Unified companies are better at adapting to change. And that means they are prepared for more changes in technology.

A good enterprise architecture simplifies the flow of technology and tech systems. And they free up specialists to focus on their area of expertise.

Increased Clarity

Enterprise architects help push a company's mission to the front of decisions. And that can make choices much simpler.

They help simplify tasks and boost the efficiency of information technology systems. This all saves time and gets the money streaming in a direction that's consistent with the company's goals.

Less Risk

Enterprise architects have a knack for simplifying information technology. And that usually means safer IT. These masters can identify potential risks and improve system security.

That also tends to turn into fewer big crashes or technological disasters.

A Focus on Measurability

One of the top things driving this positive enterprise architect career outlook is the benchmarks it can create.

It's hard to monitor progress without measurement tools.

Enterprise architects can set up measurement tools, gather data, and improve companies. And this can set a company on a path to accomplishing its strategic goals.

Skills Needed in Enterprise Architecture

Enterprise architects need to be organized and able to see the big picture. They often also have to bridge the gap between multiple departments. That means excellent communication skills are a must.

They should be able to break down complicated information for people outside the tech world.

And strong enterprise architects have a good grip on technology and information technology systems.

Here are some of common software programs that are used to build enterprise architecture plans:

  • Mega
  • Planview
  • Software AG
  • Avolution
  • Orbus
  • Sparx Systems

Education Requirements

Most enterprise architects study information technology, computer science, or a related field. But people can brighten their enterprise architecture job outlook with certifications. Technical certifications also can increase the chances of a higher salary.

Here are some of the most profitable certifications out there:

  • Certified Technical Architect (CTA)
  • AWS Certified Solution Architect
  • ITIL Master Certificate

Enterprise Architect Salary Outlook

The salary for enterprise architects has risen with increasing demand. And demand in the field is expected to increase 12 percent by 2026.

The average salary for an enterprise architect hovers around $120,000 per year. But a worker's salary can vary. Here are some factors that tend to impact an enterprise architect's earning potential:

  • Level of education
  • Exact title of the position
  • Certifications that the individual holds
  • Number of years of experience in related fields
  • Job location

Enterprise architects with fewer than five years of experience tend to make around $100,000 per year. At the same time, individuals with five to 10 years of experience make closer to $120,000 annually. Veterans who have been in the field for more than 20 years often make up to $150,000 per year.

Job location can impact salary drastically. For instance, earners in Philadelphia average almost 30 percent higher salaries than other parts of the United States. Other high salary areas include New York City, Seattle, San Francisco, and Atlanta.

Tasks and Responsibilities

Enterprise architects usually have a heavy focus on information technology. They navigate IT and provide leadership for both projects and services in the arena.

But they also tend to interact with outside customers and teams. They work to keep technology up to date, and they often gather feedback to improve systems.

Here are some common tasks for enterprise architects:

  • Finding technological solutions that fit the business' needs
  • Leading development and IT teams
  • Identifying technical problems in things like hardware, software, and security
  • Creating architecture to improve workflow or to set up new systems

Enterprise architects are expected to find solutions to problems. But they also should be able to maintain a company's current IT systems.

Much of the typical enterprise architect job duties include improving systems that are already in place.

Next Steps in Becoming an Enterprise Architect

This guide should give an overview for EA and shows a positive enterprise architect job outlook. And we have resources for all kinds of enterprise architects.

That means everyone from people entering the field to those interested in improving earning potential.

Want to boost your credentials? Check out our training section here for a list of the top upcoming training sessions for every level.

Architecture Center

Architecture Center Ltd provides consultancy and training services in the following areas: enterprise architecture, business processes management and IT systems integration.