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4 Useful Tips for Getting Enterprise Architect Certified

4 Tips for Getting Enterprise Architect Certified

4 Useful Tips for Getting Enterprise Architect Certified

Are you good at planning, designing, organizing, and implementing steps and processes? Then a career as an enterprise architect might be the one for you. Here are 4 snippets of advice from professional architects - telling you how to become enterprise architect certified.

Keyword(s): enterprise architect certified

As enterprise software prices have decreased precipitously, there are more people using the tools of professionals on an amateur level. However, without the right enterprise architects on a team, those tools could be wasted and could be creating more work for underqualified staff. Becoming enterprise architect certified could make you a major asset to your team or get a job with a firm willing to hand you the keys to the castle.

When searching for your enterprise architect certification, follow these 4 tips to get into the right program.

1. Know Why You're Doing It

Have you considered what you want to get out of getting certified as an enterprise architect? There are simpler jobs that pay just as well within the architecture field and they can be far less stressful. You shouldn't go into this job for the money.

You need to have the innate skills that an architect has. One of those skills is being open to collaboration and teamwork so that you don't have to have every skill that the ideal architect has.

An enterprise architect thinks broadly. They create wiring diagrams wherever they go, for every space as small as a shoe box or as big as the universe itself. If you think like that all the time, you have the DNA of an architect.

However, you shouldn't try to be an enterprise architect on the day after you graduate from college with your BS. You'll need to cut your teeth on the day-to-day work that architects do. Start as a modeler and build up your experience so that you can better understand the work of an architect.

After a few years, you'll begin to have what it takes to succeed.

2. Choose Your Specialty

There are several disciplines that comprise what makes up enterprise architecture. The component architecture disciplines that make up an enterprise all have their own complexity. You might find that you can quickly excel at one of them. Between business architecture, data architecture, application architecture, network, and security architecture, there a lot to learn.

Don't waste your time trying to learn every single one of them in great detail. In fact, it could be a mistake to spend that time learning every detail. You could find that it limits your creativity in tackling problems as they arise.

Be sure to learn the frameworks that will allow you to work with other disciplines. Working across component architecture disciplines will make you an asset to any organization. When you can work with all of them in some manner, you are close to being an enterprise architect and then should get certified.

Knowing the framework doesn't make you an architect, however. There's a lot of background material and fundamentals of enterprise architecture that can inform your approach. If you want people to take you seriously, you need to ensure that it sounds like you know what you're talking about.

3. Do Some Practical Work

You need to do some practical work before you become a strong enterprise architect. Work as an apprentice to a more successful architect and open yourself up to learning from them. To build a broader understanding of the field, work with a few.

When you spend 10,000 hours over the course of many years with strong enterprise architects, you'll be an expert in the field. You'll meet lots of other strong architects and people who are experts in various component architectures.

If you haven't gotten a masters degree in EA, you should do that after you put your hours in. You'll be a much stronger architect if you've got a BA or BS in a component architecture first.

Don't get a certificate instead of a degree. While some institutions will offer you a certificate, a few classes won't qualify you to be a strong EA. You'll need several courses in project management and many graduate level classes in EA before you're a true expert.

A certificate will offer you some credibility, but it's not as good as a masters degree.

4. Choose Your Certification Wisely

When you're deciding on your certification, you need to analyze the entire field. An institute that offers certification can give you the rundown on the pros and cons of each certification. While a week-long certification could be instructive, you won't become an architect that quickly.

Taking a two-week course can be a good way to understand whether you want to become an EA. However, you should be spending at least 2 intensive months studying before you try to become an EA. That way, you'll know the ins and outs of the industry, encounter real and practical hurdles, and learn how you can overcome them.

Graduate level courses are necessary for becoming a good enterprise architect. Institutions offering courses for a certification should give you credits that transfer to a state institution near you. Otherwise, you don't know how reputable these courses are.

Look for famous EA experts but also search for the people you haven't heard of before. The people teaching the courses might not be rock stars but can offer incredible advice and experience.

Becoming Enterprise Architect Certified Is Worth The Trouble

If you take the time to find the right program and become enterprise architect certified, you'll become a touchstone for the architects around you. When they struggle with their component issues, they'll turn to you for advice and recommendations. When you become an enterprise architect, you'll be a leader who can influence your team and make everyone stronger.

If you're interested in learning TOGAF or wondering whether it's useful to your certification, check out our guide for details.

Architecture Center

Architecture Center Ltd provides consultancy and training services in the following areas: enterprise architecture, business processes management and IT systems integration.